Project Update: Autumn 2016 – Figuring Out Final Steps for Publishing Field Guide #1!

Some of my friends are interested in the process of putting a book together. So, periodically, I post details involved in the most current stage of getting my curriculum series edited and ready for eventual publication. And there’s been a bit of news lately, so here it is.

Shifting From Publisher to Self-Publishing

It’s been four weeks since I found out the conventional publisher I’d hoped would be a match didn’t feel my curriculum series fit with their line. That was disappointing, but I knew it was a doorway to the next set of options to investigate: self-publishing.

What writing a book proposal for a publisher does in helping authors refine their content, the self-publishing prep process does in helping refine all the other details that a publisher would normally take care of. So, after working all month with a company that specializes in helping authors self-publish, now I have a final checklist of what has to be done to get the first volume actually available for sale! It’s a lot of administrative details, many of which I could do for myself, but just because I could do them doesn’t mean I should. Writers often miss identifying their mistakes when it comes to editing and proofreading. And many of us are horrible layout designers. For me, it’s also an issue of best stewardship for very limited energy. So, will just have to wait until the time comes and see what unfolds for hiring outside help from that company to complete those tasks.

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A Tribute and a Eulogy for Debbie “Mum” Jones

Debbie "Mum" Jones

Debbie “Mum” Jones

Debbie/Debra “Mum” Jones succumbed June 15th to kidney failure while ill with malaria, typhoid, and gastrointestinal bugs. She was in Gambi Hospital in Bahar Dar, Ethiopia.

She and her husband Andrew have been friends since 1995 – a third of my lifetime. Our stories have intertwined deeply at times, less so at others, but we’ve stayed connected for a very long time.

I wrote a eulogy for Debbie a day after I heard the news of her death. It’s later in this post. I’ve written before about Andrew and Debbie, most extensively in these posts:

’tis andrew jones’ birthday! so celebrate, already! (September 7, 2008).

Everyday DiscipLeaders – Andrew and Debbie Jones (originally posted January 5, 2009).

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Random Moment: My First Shoe-Selfies!

[~ Click on images to see larger views of the shoes! ~]

Hey all y’all – I bought shoes! A friend sent me a gift for my birthday. I told them I’d do something fun with part of it (pizza, DVDs, books), plus something practical – like socks.

Well, it ended up that I bought shoes instead of socks. I’d completely worn through the soles of my previous set of Sketchers, and the add-on insert insoles from Rite-Aid were starting to go, too. After only – what? Like, only five or six years? Outrageous.

Anyway, I figure that you can’t get a reasonable pair of heavy-duty shoes for less than $50-60, so that was my budget guideline. Shoe shopping is torturous for me, as my feet are narrow, and it’s hard to find a fit. So, I always have to wear two pairs of socks – hence, my perpetually frequent need for socks – in order not to slosh around in my shoes all the time.

I like Fluevogs, so that was what I was going for. Continue reading

Political Season 2016 ~ Post 2B: Taking the Long View on Changing Roles for Women in the Civic Square, Part 2

OVERVIEW: This series of two posts explores some dynamics for how gradual social transformation occurs over multiple generations. As a case study, I use the last 125 years of my own family’s history as pioneers on the Western frontier. As a third-generation of pioneers on both sides, I grew up taking as a given that men and women could be equally capable and competent in just about everything. In my experience, I’ve observed women contributing as much to the development of a transformed community life as have men. In this series, I share some examples from my family of such women, tie that in with some milestones in voting rights for women, and suggest a framework for making intentional innovations for a better future.

Length: Part 1 is about 2,300 words. Part 2 is about 1,700 words. Continue reading

Political Season 2016 ~ Post 2A: Taking the Long View on Changing Roles for Women in the Civic Square, Part 1

OVERVIEW: This series of two posts explores some dynamics for how gradual social transformation occurs over multiple generations. As a case study, I use the last 125 years of my own family’s history as pioneers on the Western frontier. As a third-generation of pioneers on both sides, I grew up taking as a given that men and women could be equally capable and competent in just about everything. In my experience, I’ve observed women contributing as much to the development of a transformed community life as have men. In this series, I share some examples from my family of such women, tie that in with some milestones in voting rights for women, and suggest a framework for making intentional innovations for a better future.

Length: Part 1 is about 2,300 words. Part 2 is about 1,700 words. Continue reading

Political Season 2016 ~ Post 1: Immersion Learning at Simulated Democratic Conventions in 1972

Early this year, the BBC published a piece

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