A Cultural Geography of Survivor Communities – Part 1B: Application to the Collective Christian #MeToo Movement

1 – A Paradigm Profile and Cultural GPS

of the Christian Wing(s) of the #MeToo Movement

PART 1B

1 – A Paradigm Profile and Cultural GPS of the Christian Wing(s) of the #MeToo Movement. This two-part article is the most technical in the series, but foundational to all else in analyzing this movement’s paradigm, problems, and possibilities.

Part 1A applies aspects of paradigm profiling, subcultural emergence, and social transformation tracking to the punk rock subculture and “emerging ministry movement.” This gives us a robust historical example as a framework to consider what brings people together into movements, and how things tend to change over time in it.

Part 1B applies these frameworks to give an initial profile for the Christian version of the #MeToo movement. I base this description primarily on my own personal experiences, online interactions, and other sources. It includes my initial analysis of key elements of common ground that unify this movement. I also identify issues where there are considerable doctrinal differences that may have the power to fragment the movement if participants choose strict conformity over stepped collaboration.

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Introduction to Part 1B and Part 2

In Part 1A, we looked at big picture of why and how social movements come together, and how they tend to change over time. The point was to see a historical example of how these processes work, because it’s difficult to identify many of these elements while they are happening in a current subculture of change like we have with the #MeToo movement. In this post, I’ll apply those general cultural storylines and change principles to look more specifically at key components in the paradigm in the Christian collective of the #MeToo movement:

  1. How do we identify paradigm dimensions that let us profile this collective’s GPS?
  2. What are the core beliefs and values most involved in the Christian wings of the #MeToo movement?
  3. What key issues already represent fragmentation fault lines or areas of ignorance?
  4. What unsettled questions on culpability for abuse could become fault lines that splinter the movement?

In looking ahead, this post bridges us toward Part 2, where we’ll look at a related segments of the Church population that is, may be, or should be interested in #MeToo. There we’ll look at who’s in, who’s out, who’s suspect, and why. This includes those who want to be in the movement but haven’t established credibility with insiders to be in a position to lead (at least, not yet); they may not even be listening yet. And there are those who need to be in the movement to support survivors, but who don’t really want to be. What are the dynamics of these wannabe and should-be groups? But first, some key doctrines and dynamics of those already inside this movement. Continue reading

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A Cultural Geography of Survivor Communities – Part 1A: Paradigm Profiling, Subcultural Emergence, Social Transformation Tracking

1 – A Paradigm Profile and Cultural GPS

of the Christian Wing(s) of the #MeToo Movement

1 – A Paradigm Profile and Cultural GPS of the Christian Wing(s) of the #MeToo Movement. This two-part article is the most technical in the series, but foundational to all else in analyzing this movement’s paradigm, problems, and possibilities.

Part 1A applies aspects of paradigm profiling, subcultural emergence, and social transformation tracking to the punk rock subculture and “emerging ministry movement.” This gives us a robust historical example as a framework to consider what brings people together into movements, and how things tend to change over time in it.

Part 1B applies these frameworks to give an initial profile for the Christian version of the #MeToo movement. I base this description primarily on my own personal experiences, online interactions, and other sources. It includes my initial analysis of key elements of common ground that unify this movement. I also identify issues where there are considerable doctrinal differences that may have the power to fragment the movement if participants choose strict conformity over stepped collaboration. Continue reading

A Cultural Geography of Survivor Communities – Introduction

Introduction. This post shares some of my background related to archiving, cultural geography, and futuring, and how these disciplines come together in developing this series. In this cultural geography of abuse/violence survivor communities, I will attempt to capture the contours of topics and trends that I have worked in and around, some of them for over 40 years.

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What cartography, GPS, and Google map videos do for physical landscapes, “cultural geography” does for cultural landscapes and their surrounding social eco-systems. This interdisciplinary approach to human ecology seeks to capture the composition contours and key issue features in some kind of social group, culture, or organization. That’s what I hope to do for Christian abuse/violence survivor communities, at least in a preliminary way, from what I’ve absorbed while working in and around them.

I know from my past studies in analyzing subculture emergence, social movements, and cultural paradigm shifts, that it’s difficult to be precise when you’re trying to survey what’s happening at the same time that you’re swirling in a whirlpool of change. But certain kinds of things do become evident – or at least present themselves of indicators of which ways the waters are moving. And that’s the situation that confronts us with the #MeToo movement and its related Church-based counterparts. There are some things we can grab on to fairly easily, but still a lot of questions floating around.

So – with that in mind – I want to convey three things in this introduction:

  1. What this series will cover.
  2. Why it is timely to do so.
  3. How I will approach things.

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A Cultural Geography of Survivor Communities – Listing of Posts, Summaries, and Links

This post serves as an index to posts in the forthcoming series, “A Cultural Geography of Survivor Communities,” and to previous posts appearing in the futuristguy category of “Trends in Survivor Communities.” I have been working on some segments in the cultural geography for over six months, and hope to have most of the series posted before the end of 2018. The trends articles were posted as early as 2012, but often with observations and analysis going back to as early as the mid-1970s.

These are based on my personal experiences far more than theoretical research. As such, they are idiosyncratic — what I have observed, analyzed, and interpreted — rather than synthesizing the research of others. Still, I hope these resources will help those inside and outside the range of abuse/violence survivor communities to better understand some of the dimensions and dynamics involved.

~ brad/futuristguy, December 4, 2018

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Reader’s Chronological Visual Guide to the World of Frank Herbert’s Dune

“Futuristic soldier desert dune,” (c) Luca Oleastri, Fotolia #29470232, licensed to Brad Sargent.

“All governments suffer a recurring problem: Power attracts pathological personalities. It is not that power corrupts but that it is magnetic to the corruptible.”

~ Frank Herbert’s Children of Dune, Promotional Calendar for 2003 SyFy Mini-Series

ON THIS PAGE:

  • Reader’s Chronological Visual Guide to the Worlds of Frank Herbert’s Dune
  • All-in-One Link List
  • Legends of Dune Trilogy [#01-#06]
  • Great Schools Series [#07-#10]
  • House Trilogy [#11-#13]
  • Dune Chronicles and Heroes of Dune [#14-#28]
  • The Grand Finale (i.e., Dune 7) [#29-#30]
  • Other Resources

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Reader’s Chronological Visual Guide

to the Worlds of Frank Herbert’s Dune

I am a fan of Dune, and especially like the SciFi [now SyFy] channel’s mini-series for Dune (2000) and Children of Dune (2003). (I am posting this on the 18th anniversary of the Dune mini-series broadcast.)

Since 2003, I have been collecting the Dune materials shown here and on other pages in a forthcoming fansite (stay tuned for link when I go live!). The following reader’s guide puts all books and short stories in the universe of Dune into chronological order, as best as possible, and then adds in images of the covers. I created this list initially as a guide for when I complete a book project I’m writing — as reading the entire Dune saga is my motivational reward. But I decided to share it, and posted an earlier edition of this visual bibliography in 2011 on my futuristguy blog, and have been working at completing it since then.

I started this reader’s guide with the chronology and various trilogy/series titles found on the official Dune novels website and then added other specific details about promotional editions, other versions, and various sources into the chronology. So, this reader’s guide includes prequels and sequels to Frank Herbert’s original six-book series, as well as “inquels” (additional stories and deleted scenes that coincide with the timeline of an existing novel) and “midquels” (additional stories and novels that bridge the timelines found in two novels). Sometimes there are different descriptions available for the short stories, and it is difficult to determine whether a particular story should be viewed as an inquel or midquel, so those designations on short stories are still tentative until I can get the entire Duniverse read in order.

Short stories are found in quotation marks. Novels are in italics. The six novels and few additional Dune stories by Frank Herbert himself are so noted. All other items were written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. Most links are to hardcover editions, and, whenever possible, from the current publisher.

All images shown are scans of books in my personal collection.

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All-in-One Dune Link List

Readers Guide Sections

Continue reading

GC2 and Questions to Evaluate Our Expertise on Systemic Abuse and Sexual Violence

This article was originally posted as a thread in my Twitter feed. I have edited it to remove abbreviations, embed links, and add bracketed words for understandability. Otherwise, it is the same as posted there.

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THREAD: QUESTIONS TO EVALUATE OUR EXPERTISE ON SYSTEMIC ABUSE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE. This is in response to a critical question posed by Wade Mullen, in a thread about the December 13th GC2 Summit on Responding to Sexual Violence.

While I wish GC2 well on their efforts, I did post concerns. The past few days, new articles have promoted GC2. Meanwhile, many abuse survivors, advocates, and activists have reiterated concerns about GC2 individual, institutional, and ideological issues. Continue reading

Veterans Day, PTSD, The Lord of the Rings, and Winnie-the-Pooh

War is devastating, and World War I was particularly so. According to a BBC segment on A Lost Generation, “It is believed that World War One had the highest number of active serving writers, artists and musicians of any war in history, many of whom were part of the estimated nine million military casualties.”

Among those cultural creatives who fought in the war were J.R.R. Tolkien and A.A. Milne. How might their wartime experiences and possibly even post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have played a role in what they wrote and why? What personal and social dynamics did suffering, loss, and grief bring to their country, and how might this have affected the ways in which these authors’ works were received?

Continue reading